Saturday, 26 February 2011

Thoughts on Framing

All you printmakers out there...what are your thoughts on framing.

  1. Do you do your own or do you buy cheap ones from IKEA or somewhere similar or do you get them made by a framer?  
  2. What dictates your choice?
  3. How do you select the moulding? 
  4. Do you choose one to fit the print or do you have a standard moulding you use for all your prints.
  5. Does it change over time? 
  6. What dictates the change?
Just wondering what other people do? I send mine to a local framer. When we (Horsley Printmakers) submit a large order we get a substantial discount. The framer was also selected on the basis that they pick up the order and deliver either back to the studio or to the gallery where the work is due for exhibition. I choose to do this
  1. Because I don't have the skills to frame my own work.
  2. I don't have the time and would rather use my time to make more prints than make frames.
  3. The pick up and delivery service also means I have more time for more productive activities.
  4. I no longer use cheap frames because they tend to come in standard sizes which is a bit limiting but more importantly if I'm making quality work I feel the frame and the materials used in the framing should match the quality of the work. 
What do you think?

5 comments:

northwoods trekker said...

1. Do you do your own or do you buy cheap ones from IKEA or somewhere similar or do you get them made by a framer?
I have put one or two into IKEA frames since they were a nicely finished birch wood in a square format that fit some of my square work nicely.
But generally I have established a longterm good business relationship with a local framer and they allow me to pick & choose from overstock mouldings or end pieces. They make me some custom & standard sizes but sell to me at wholesale. I also sometimes do a barter with the owner...some of my work in exchange for frames.

2. What dictates your choice?
I tend to strive for simplicity but a contemporary look in the way my work is presented. My philosophy is let the work do the talking. I try not to have it compete with loud mat colours or busy or heavy frames.
3. How do you select the moulding?
By colour. price and material. I tend to favour polished metals or natural woods.
4. Do you choose one to fit the print or do you have a standard moulding you use for all your prints.
I tend to choose a frame appropriate for the mat and the work so that can differ from one to the next.
5. Does it change over time?
I am finding the simple wood and metal mouldings (that is clean narrow lines) are what I stick to and think that will remain fashionable in the future in terms of decorum.
6. What dictates the change?
Tastes in decor generally would dictate change but I feel confident that my framing is appealing for the moment. Once a piece of my art work has been purchased it is entirely up to the owner to determine if they want to present it differently.

Carol's Original Prints said...

Thanks again Brian for your reply. It's always good to hear how other printmakers make their decisions.

Tracy Turner said...

Do you do your own or do you buy cheap ones from IKEA or somewhere similar or do you get them made by a framer?

I struggled to do my own frames years ago and realised I needed to heavily invest in equipment and improve my skills.

For exhibitions where I need a standard look and format I will usually buy from IKEA.

Otherwise I now tend to look out for quality plain wooden frames or box frames from charity shops. The downside of this is obviously ending up with random sizes and styles.

What dictates your choice?

Quality of build/finish, modern/neutral style, price.

How do you select the moulding?

Something plain which will go in most homes. Light woods or light finishes.

Do you choose one to fit the print or do you have a standard moulding you use for all your prints.

I want to standardise my print sizes so that I can order in quality frames in a size to fit all.

Does it change over time?

Not in a huge way. It's a bit like those house styling programmes, you need to present your work neutrally in a way that it will appeal to a range of buyers and fit in modern or traditionally decorated homes.

What dictates the change?

Just the need to keep up with trends but also present in as neutral way as possible.

I would usually pick up colour trends in the colours of an abstract print rather than in the mount and frame. Printing small numbers in the season's must have fashionable colours can ensure a good turnover of your work in galleries.

Many buyers go out looking for 'something to go in the blue room', rather than with a particular subject in mind.

Gail Brodholt said...

A few years ago, I was arranging to deliver some work to a gallery and asked the owner if she wanted some framed pieces. "Oh no" she said "I don't take artists' frames - they're not good enough quality. If the artist doesn't think their work is worth a professional frame, then my customers won't either."
A bit harsh, I know, but it's something I've taken with me ever since ....
By the way, Carol, I think there's something in the air - I haven't posted for a month either - but I see you beaten me to it...

Carol's Original Prints said...

I couldn't agree more Gail. There is nothing worse than a really nice print framed in a cheap and shoddy frame. It makes it very hard to justify asking a decent price for the print.

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